Taiwanese American Heritage Week 2021 Wrap-Up Post

This is my fourth year doing this series on my blog and also the year I’ve had the most posts to fill the week. It’s been a busy, hectic week but also a rewarding one. To wrap things up, I thought I’d share some books that I read recently, am currently reading, or want to read that are by Taiwanese authors and that I haven’t prominently featured on my blog. I’m also sharing some upcoming books by Taiwanese authors that you should keep an eye out for.

Recently Read:

  • Reading with Patrick by Michelle Kuo – This is a memoir by a Taiwanese American lawyer who works in immigrant and prisoner justice advocacy. When Michelle Kuo was younger, she did a two-year stint with Teach for America at an underfunded, majority Black public school in the Deep South, naively thinking she would be like the teacher in Freedom Writers. Not-So-Spoiler: It didn’t pan out like that. The memoir discusses her teaching experience and delves into the pitfalls of her initial approach and mentality. It also probes her regrets in leaving her teaching position for law school after finding out that one of her favorite former students, Patrick Browning, is in jail and going to be tried for murder. It chronicles the ways she tries to help him improve his literacy and sustain hope while he is imprisoned. The book is extremely candid in a way that I cannot imagine is easy to be public about, and I think it makes a good read for class-privileged East Asians who want to be better about allyship and solidarity. One of my dissatisfactions is that I wish Patrick had been given an equal voice in the book.
  • Hot Pot Night! by Vincent Chen – This is a quick but fun read. It’s a colorful, joyful picture book about food and community and a hot pot dinner bringing together some neighbors.

Currently Reading:

  • The Collected Schizophrenias by Esmé  Weijun Wang – This essay collection explores the author’s experience with mental illness, specifically schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. It approaches mental illness from a number of angles, such as the history of the DSM and the changes it underwent, the hierarchies of mental illness created by the psychiatric field, the way mentally ill people may try to distance ourselves from those who are visibly “crazier” than we are, the personal experience of trying to mask one’s mental illness or pass as “normal” (with mixed results), and so on. I’m only about halfway through, but I find it very compelling.
  • Notes of a Crocodile by Qiu Miaojin, Translated by Bonnie Huie – This is a translated novel set in the years following the lifting of martial law in Taiwan (after 1987). The main character is a lesbian in college who befriends a bunch of misfits, and the story full of queer yearning and infatuation, as well as a deep ambivalence and even antipathy toward society’s suffocating norms. I’m not sure I get everything that’s happening in the book, but it’s still fascinating to read as a window into my own queer Taiwanese genealogy.
  • Bestiary by K-Ming Chang – This book follows the stories of three generations of Taiwanese American women, the youngest of whom is queer. There is a lot of viscerally gross imagery that’s super unsettling, but I’m making my way slowly through it to sift through the layers. The central motif of the tiger comes from a well-known Taiwanese folktale called 虎姑婆 (Auntie Tiger) that I grew up with that is similar in a lot of ways to stories about wolves in Western folktales (e.g. The Three Little Pigs, Little Red Riding Hood).
  • Love, Love by Victoria Chang – This is a middle grade novel-in-verse that’s inspired by the author’s experiences of being a second generation Asian American. The story takes places several decades ago, but a lot of the experiences are still relevant because unfortunately, people are still racist. The main character’s older sister has trichotillomania, which is rare mental illness rep for Asian kidlit.

Want to Read:

  • Two Trees Make a Forest by Jessica J. Lee – This is a memoir that documents the author’s journey to reconnect with her heritage while exploring the natural landscapes in Taiwan. It contains reflections on geography and colonial mapmaking practices.
  • This is My Brain in Love by I.W. Gregorio – Jocelyn Wu’s family runs a Chinese restaurant. Will Domenici, who’s biracial Black and Italian, signs up to work at the restaurant. They fall for each other, but their family’s prejudices and their respective mental illnesses make it a rough ride.
  • Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu – This just won the National Book Award. It’s about a guy delving into family secrets and the history of his Chinatown.
  • Ghost Month by Ed Lin – Murder mystery and Taiwanese night markets. Enough said.
  • The Stolen Bicycle by Wu Ming-yi – I read another book by this author, The Man with the Compound Eyes, in one of my undergrad classes, and I liked it, so I’m trying out this one, too. It is also about searching for family secrets and touches on the history of Japanese occupation of Taiwan.
  • A Thousand Moons on a Thousand Rivers by Hsiao Li-Hung (original Chinese title: 千江有水千江月) – This book is set in the 80s and is considered a classic of Taiwanese literature. My dad said the main character shares a lot in common with him, and I’ve been meaning to read it for several years.
  • Chrysanthemum: Voices of the Taiwanese Diaspora edited by Andrea Chu, Kevin Ko-wen Chen, and Albertine Wang – I am angry that I missed the deadline for submitting to this and that I also missed the Kickstarter for this, buuut, I managed to find a copy through Eastwind Books (if you’re interested in this one, go see if they still have any in stock). My copy is on the way to me as I speak/type.

Upcoming Releases:

2021

  • Bone House by K-Ming Chang (June 29th, 2021) – A queer Taiwanese micro-retelling of Wuthering Heights!
  • City of Illusion by Victoria Ying (July 27th, 2021) – This is the sequel to City of Secrets, which I interviewed Victoria about last year.
  • I am an American: The Wong Kim Art Story, written by Martha Brockenbrough and Grace Lin and illustrated by Julia Kuo (November 2nd, 2021) – This picture book covers an important chapter of Asian American history from the late 19th century where an American-born Chinese man with parents who were non-citizens fought for his right to U.S. citizenship. It was something we learned about in my Asian American studies courses, and I’m glad that history is being made accessible to young people.
  • Feather and Flame by Livia Blackburne (November 9th, 2021) – Mulan retelling, second in a series of Disney retelling/spinoffs called The Queen’s Council that connects different Disney stories. I am here for all of the #OwnVoices Mulan retellings tbh.
  • Jade Legacy by Fonda Lee (November 30th, 2021) – The long-awaited conclusion to the Greenbone Saga. If you know, you know. And if you haven’t already, READ JADE CITY!!!
  • Win! by Cynthia Yuan Cheng – This is supposed to come out this year but since we don’t have a cover or an official synopsis yet, there’s a possibility it’s gotten pushed back, which is okay because we’re in a panini and graphic novels are incredibly labor intensive, but also I NEED IT!!! It’s a graphic novel memoir about Cynthia’s experience joining her school’s football team as the only girl.

2022

  • Let’s Do Everything and Nothing by Julia Kuo (March 1st, 2022) – Julia illustrated I Dream of Popo and a bunch of other books, but this is her second (I think) picture book where she is both author and illustrator.
  • A Magic Steeped in Poison by Judy I. Lin (March 22nd, 2022) – Judy was among the first people I interviewed for Taiwanese American Heritage Week back in 2017. This isn’t the book we talked about in her interview, but it’s her debut. The cover is absolutely stunning. Please support it!!!
  • Untitled (#AATTMBook) by Emily X.R. Pan (April 2022) – I read an early draft of this in 2019 and I am waiting until I am allowed to yell about how great it is in more detail. I’m also looking forward to reading the new and improved version.
  • Unhappy Camper by Lily LaMotte and Ann Xu (Summer 2022) – Just announced recently. It’s a middle grade graphic novel in which a girl and her sister rebuild their sibling bond and learn more about their heritage at a Taiwanese American summer camp.
  • Boys I Know by Anna Gracia (Summer 2022) – Also just announced and no Goodreads page for it yet. “18-year-old June, a Taiwanese American girl, navigates sex, love, and Planned Parenthood in her small Midwestern town.”
  • When You Wish Upon a Lantern by Gloria Chao (Fall 2022) – Just announced earlier last week. A teen girl whose family owns a wishing lantern shop in Chicago’s Chinatown tries to revitalize it by helping make the customers’ wishes come true behind the scenes. She teams up with the boy whose family runs the mooncake bakery next door and romantic shenanigans ensue.

2023

  • Hungry Ghost by Victoria Ying – A contemporary YA graphic novel about a Chinese American girl who struggles with an eating disorder.

Thanks to everyone who has read my posts for this past week! Hope to see y’all again next time.

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