Category Archives: TBR

Trope-ical Readathon TBR

Hello, again! I’m doing another reading challenge in August because it’s one of the few ways I can create structure for the monstrosity that is my TBR pile. (If you’re wondering when I’m actually going to post a book review again, rest assured that reviews will be coming in the following months as I’m scheduled for several blog tours for amazing books!) The reading challenge is called the Trope-ical Readathon and is co-hosted by Jenny @ JenJenReviews and her partner Rob. The page with the detailed readathon information is here.

Basically, there are 13 common challenges that every participant can do (each has an alternate prompt as well) and then 5 different teams divided up by genre you can join that each have their own assigned team book plus 2 more challenges. I’m joining Team Contemporary/Literary/Historical Fiction. The books you pick for any given challenge, including the team-specific ones, do not have to be of the genres associated with your team, so as a result my TBR is actually very SFF-heavy (which is not surprising if you’re familiar with my reading tastes, lol).

Trope-ical Readathon Common Challenges

My Common Challenge Book Selections

  • Absent/Dead Parent(s) Trope: The Silvered Serpents by Roshani Chokshi
  • Strange Names Trope: The Sound of Stars by Alechia Dow (male protagonist is an alien named M0Rr1S)
  • Outbreak/Pandemic Trope: Shadowshaper Legacy by Daniel Jose Older (I’m doing the alternate prompt, and this book is the third in a series)
  • Forbidden Romance Trope: Mad, Bad & Dangerous to Know by Samira Ahmed
  • Dystopia Trope: Rebelwing by Andrea Tang
  • Blast from the Past Trope: The Wolf of Oren-Yaro by K.S. Villoso
  • Mixed Media Trope: The Weight of the Stars by K. Ancrum
  • Artificial Intelligence Trope: The Life Below by Alexandra Monir
  • Amnesia Trope: The True Queen by Zen Cho
  • Enemies to Lovers/Enemies to Friends Trope: A Song of Wraiths and Ruin by Roseanne A. Brown
  • Chosen One Trope: Forest of Souls by Lori M. Lee
  • The New Kid in Town Trope: A Love Hate Thing by Whitney D. Grandison
  • Retelling Trope: A Spark of White Fire by Sangu Mandanna (retelling of the Mahabharata)

Team Contemporary, Literary, Historical Fiction

My Team Challenge Book Selections

  • A Coming-of-Age Novel: Not So Pure and Simple by Lamar Giles
  • “War” Trope: We Are Not Free by Traci Chee (set in World War II)

This is a pretty ambitious TBR, but I’m looking forward to the challenge. 🙂

Koreadathon TBR

I’m perhaps a little too ambitious about my reading this month because I escaped my reading slump, so I’m participating in multiple reading challenges, LOL. This one is for Korean books and authors and is hosted by booktubers Monica (YouTube/Twitter) and Chloe (YouTube/Twitter). You can find more about the readathon on the official Twitter account @koreadathon.

Here’s what I’ve picked for each prompt!

  1. Group Book (ok this wasn’t chosen by me): The Silence of Bones by June Hur – YA, Historical Fiction, Mystery
  2. Book with a person on the cover: Rogue Heart by Axie Oh (companion to Rebel Seoul) – YA, Science Fiction
  3. Book translated from Korean: Human Acts by Han Kang – Adult, Historical Fiction
  4. Book featuring a diaspora Korean character: Stand Up, Yumi Chung! by Jessica Kim – MG, Contemporary
  5. Book featuring Korean mythology: The Dragon Egg Princess by Ellen Oh – MG, Fantasy (Note: this is a secondary world fantasy with worldbuilding that’s inspired by Korean mythology and folklore)

Transathon TBR

I’m a bit late to the party, but this month I’m participating in a reading challenge called Transathon, which spotlights trans authors and books. Here are the prompts and my choices for each.

Transathon 2020

  • A book written by a trans woman: Fierce Femmes and Notorious Liars: A Dangerous Trans Girl’s Confabulous Memoir by Kai Cheng Thom
  • A book written by a nonbinary person: King and the Dragonflies by Kacen Callender – MG, Contemporary, Gay Black Boy MC
  • A book written by a trans man: Stay Gold by Tobly McSmith – YA, Contemporary, Trans Boy MC
  • A book with a trans MC: Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas – YA, Fantasy, Gay Latinx Trans Boy MC
  • A nonfiction trans book: Redefining Realness by Janet Mock
  • A book with a nonbinary MC: No More Heroes by Michelle Kan – YA/NA, Urban Fantasy, Asexual/Gray-Aromantic Genderfluid Cantonese Chinese MC (plus other queer, disabled, POC characters)
  • A book with multiple trans characters: An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon – Adult, Science Fiction, Black Nonbinary MC
  • A book with the word trans in the title: Queer & Trans Artists of Color Volume Three, interviews by Nia King, edited by Maliha Ahmed
  • A graphic novel with a trans main character: Mooncakes by Wendy Xu – YA, Fantasy, Queer Chinese American MCs (one cis, one trans & nonbinary)

(Note: All of the authors above are trans except Wendy Xu.)

#RainbowReadathon TBR and Other QTPOC Books to Read During Pride Month

So…the pandemic has really killed my ability to read novels recently, but I’m trying to turn that momentum around by participating in a reading challenge, #RainbowReadathon (@RainbowReadThon on Twitter).

The goal is to read 9 books, one with a cover corresponding to the color of each of the 8 stripes in the original Pride flag, plus one multicolored one. Here’s my TBR!

Rainbow Readathon 2020 TBR

  • Pink: The Henna Wars by Adiba Jaigirdar – Young Adult, Contemporary, Bengali Irish MC, f/f romance
  • Red: Felix Ever After by Kacen Callender – Young Adult, Contemporary, Nonbinary (Demiboy) Black MC, enby/m romance
  • Orange: We Are Totally Normal by Rahul Kanakia – Young Adult, Contemporary, Gay Indian MC, m/m romance
  • Yellow: I’ll Be the One by Lyla Lee – Young Adult, Contemporary, Fat Bisexual Korean MC, m/f romance
  • Green: If It Makes You Happy by Claire Kann – Young Adult, Contemporary, Polyamorous Asexual Black MC, f/f queerplatonic relationship
  • Turquoise: All Boys Aren’t Blue by George M. Johnson – Young Adult, Memoir, Gay Black MC
  • Indigo: No More Heroes by Michelle Kan – Young Adult, Urban Fantasy, Genderfluid Aromantic and Asexual MC
  • Violet: You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson – Young Adult, Contemporary, Bisexual Black Girl MC, f/f romance
  • Multicolor: We Unleash the Merciless Storm by Tehlor Kay Mejia (Sequel to We Set the Dark on Fire) – Young Adult, Dystopian, Queer Latina MC, f/f romance

Assuming I finish the books above, I’m hoping to get around to some other books by QTPOC:

Darius the Great Deserves Better by Adib Khorram (Sequel to Darius the Great is Not Okay, which I reviewed here; out August 25th, 2020) – Young Adult, Contemporary, Biracial Iranian American MC, m/m romance

The Summer of Everything by Julian Winters (out September 8th, 2020) – Young Adult, Contemporary, Gay Black MC, m/m romance

Each of Us a Desert by Mark Oshiro (out September 15th, 2020) – Young Adult, Fantasy, Sapphic Latina MC, f/f romance

How It All Blew Up by Arvin Ahmadi (out September 22nd, 2020) – Young Adult, Contemporary, Gay Muslim Iranian American MC

The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea by Maggie Tokuda-Hall – Young Adult, Fantasy, Queer Japanese-coded MC, f/genderfluid romance

The Black Flamingo by Dean Atta – Young Adult, Novel-in-Verse, Gay Black MC

The Stars and the Blackness Between Them by Junauda Petrus – Young Adult, Contemporary, Black MC and Trinidadian Immigrant MC, f/f romance

Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera – Young Adult, Contemporary, Lesbian Puerto Rican MC

How to Be Remy Cameron by Julian Winters – Young Adult, Contemporary, Gay Black Adoptee MC

Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron (out July 7th, 2020) – Young Adult, Fantasy, Lesbian Black MC, f/f romance

Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas (out September 1st, 2020) – Young Adult, Fantasy, Gay Trans Latinx MC, m/m romance

The Black Veins by Ashia Monet – Young Adult, Fantasy, Bisexual Black Girl MC

For a comprehensive list of 2020 queer YA books, see this post by Michelle @ Magical Reads. And while you’re here, if you haven’t seen it already, please also check out my Twitter thread featuring 2020 YA books by Black authors.

Pondathon Sign-Up Post and TBR

Pondathon: The Quiet Pond's story-driven readathon. Image: Two swords with vines wrapped around it frame the words 'Pondathon', with three little forest sprites sitting on top. One forest sprite has a leaf on its head, the middle has twigs for horns, and the right has a mushroom on its head.

What is the Pondathon?

The Pondathon is a co-operative and story-driven readathon hosted and run by CW from The Quiet Pond. The aim of the Pondathon is to read books and collect points to protect the friends over at The Quiet Pond from the encroaching malevolent forces that threaten our friends in the forest.

Have fun participating in the Pondathon readathon by joining one of five teams, each with a unique way to collect points and signing up! You can also follow the story of the Pondathon as it unfolds, and participants can also complete ‘side quests’ during the readathon to collect extra points. The readathon takes place from January 24th 2020 to March 7th 2020. More information about the readathon can be found here.

Information about Joining the Pondathon

  1. To join the Pondathon, simply sign up anytime between January 18th 2020 to March 5th 2020.
  2. Choose a team, create your own animal character for the Pondathon and create a character card!
  3. Create a blog post, bookstagram post, booktube video, Twitter thread, or whatever medium you wish, with ‘#Pondathon’ in the title or your tweet. Share the character you have created and your character card!
  4. Link back to this post so that others can find this readathon and join in.

Share your updates on your blog/bookstagram/booktube and social media. You are more than welcome to tag @thequietpond or @artfromafriend on Twitter or Instagram in all your updates! We’d love to see all of the beautiful and awesome characters that you create!

My Pond Character

'

My Pond Character is Cyrus, an orange fox with round glasses who can usually be found carrying a book. They are a warrior of the word. They believe words have power and must be wielded carefully and responsibly. Verbal spells, spoken and written, are a critical part of their arsenal of weapons. They also bear a trusty staff that they use to focus their magic. Cyrus will be joining Team Xiaolong.

team xiaolong full


My Pondathon TBR

 

I don’t have my entire TBR planned  for the entire duration of the readathon, but this is tentatively what I’ll be reading for the next two and a half-ish weeks. It’s a combination of newer eARCs, backlist eARCs (many from 2017 *sweats*) and my physical TBR (which I already posted a sort-of complete list of for #StartOnYourShelfAthon…I say sort-of because I’ve since acquired more books oops).

  1. The Weight of Our Sky by Hanna Alkaf
  2. Sick Kids in Love by Hannah Moskowitz
  3. The Last 8 by Laura Pohl
  4. The First 7 by Laura Pohl
  5. This Light Between Us by Andrew Fukuda
  6. This Time Will Be Different by Misa Sugiura
  7. Woven in Moonlight Isabel Ibañez
  8. The Grief Keeper by Alexandra Villasante
  9. Bluecrowne by Kate Milford
  10. The Thief Knot by Kate Milford
  11. Riot Baby by Tochi Onyebuchi
  12. War Girls by Tochi Onyebuchi
  13. A Dash of Trouble by Anna Meriano
  14. A Sprinkle of Spirits by Anna Meriano
  15. A Mixture of Mischief by Anna Meriano
  16. Diamond City by Francesca Flores
  17. We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia
  18. Don’t Read the Comments by Eric Smith
  19. Girl Gone Viral by Arvin Ahmadi
  20. Patron Saints of Nothing by Randy Ribay
  21. Belle RĂ©volte by Linsey Miller
  22. Water in May Ismée Miel Williams
  23. Fake It Till You Break It by Jenn P. Nguyen
  24. Crossing Ebenezer Creek by Tonya Bolden
  25. Somewhere Only We Know by Maurene Goo
  26. Dark Chapter by Winnie M. Li
  27. I Love You So Mochi by Sarah Kuhn
  28. The Leavers by Lisa Ko
  29. Where the Stars Rise edited by Lucas K. Law & Derwin Mak
  30. Meet Cute edited by Jennifer L. Armentrout, Dhonielle Clayton, Katie Cotugno, Jocelyn Davies, Huntley Fitzpatrick, Nina LaCour, Emery Lord, Katharine McGee, Kass Morgan, Julie Murphy, Meredith Russo, Sara Shepard, Nicola Yoon, Ibi Zoboi
  31. The Beast Player by Nahoko Uehashi
  32. We Hunt the Flame by Hasfah Faizal
  33. This Train is Being Held by Ismée Miel Williams
  34. Searching for Sylvie Lee by Jean Kwok

#ARCAugust TBR

Another month, another reading challenge! For those who are curious as to what happened with my #24in48 challenge, I managed to finish 7 out of the 10 books on my TBR for the challenge, which is probably the most success I’ve had with a reading challenge in a while since I started working full-time. Despite burning through 7 ARCs for #24in48, I still have a million and one ARCs to get through, which is why I’m signing up for #ARCAugust. Here’s my rough TBR in no particular order (minus the split between YA and Adult)!

YA Fiction

  • Water in May by Ismee Amiel Williams
  • The Belles by Dhonielle Clayton
  • Solo by Kwame Alexander
  • The Edge of the Abyss by Emily Skrutskie
  • Starswept by Mary Fan
  • That Inevitable Victorian Thing by E.K. Johnston
  • A Line in the Dark by Malinda Lo
  • The Speaker by Traci Chee

Adult Fiction

  • The Red Threads of Fortune by JY Yang
  • The Black Tides of Heaven by JY Yang
  • Songs of Insurrection by JC Kang
  • Love and Other Consolation Prizes by Jamie Ford
  • Jade City by Fonda Lee
  • The Leavers by Lisa Ko

#24in48 Readathon TBR

As a way to force myself away from social media for a while and knock out a chunk of my TBR, I decided to join the #24in48 readathon. What is it? From #24in48:

If you’re new to 24in48, this is the basic gist: beginning at 12:01am on Saturday morning and running through 11:59pm on Sunday night, participants read for 24 hours out of that 48-hour period. You can split that up however you’d like: 20 hours on Saturday, four hours on Sunday; 12 hours each day; six four-hour sessions with four hour breaks in between, whatever you’d like.

Based on my average reading speed and the average page count per book, I’m setting my goal at 10 books. Picking which books to read out of my TBR actually wasn’t hard because I am due to send out the last batch of my BEA ARC acquisitions soon, so this is my last ditch effort to read the ones that I reeeally wanted to read before I sent them out to the marginalized bloggers I promised them to. Here are the books in no particular order!

  • You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins (September 12th) – YA, Historical Fiction, #ownvoices Indian/Bengali American MCs
  • Beasts Made of Night by Tochi Onyebuchi (October 31st) – YA, #ownvoices Nigerian-inspired Fantasy, Black MC
  • The Belles by Dhonielle Clayton (February 20th,, 2018) – YA, Fantasy, #ownvoices Black MC
  • Dear Martin by Nic Stone (October 17th) – YA, Contemporary, #ownvoices Black MC
  • 27 Hours by Tristina Wright (October 3rd) – YA, Science Fiction/Fantasy, various QPOC characters (#ownvoices bi rep)
  • They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera (September 5th) – YA, Speculative Fiction (idk what do classify this as lol), #ownvoices queer Latinx MC, M/M romance
  • Wild Beauty by Anna-Marie McLemore (September 26th) – YA, Magical Realism, #ownvoices queer Latina MC
  • The Stars Beneath Our Feet by David Barclay Moore (September 19th) – MG/YA, Contemporary, #ownvoices Black MC
  • Water in May by Ismee Amiel Williams (September 12th) – YA, Contemporary, Dominican MC (author is Cuban)
  • Calling My Name by Liara Tamani (October 24th) – YA, Contemporary, #ownvoices Black+Christian MC

You are permitted to cry in the comments about how utterly amazing this lineup is, I am crying as well. ;~;

Asian Lit Bingo TBR!

I announced the launch of Asian Lit Bingo yesterday, and since then, I’ve been busy putting together my own tentative TBR for the challenge. It’s a good opportunity to read a lot of the books I’ve had sitting on my shelves but haven’t gotten around to because of reasons. So without further ado, here is my super ambitious TBR!

AsianLitBingo

  1. East Asian MC – The Emperor’s Riddle by Kat Zhang – #ownvoices, MG, Contemporary, Adventure, Chinese American MC
  2. Asian Refugee MC – The Refugees by Viet Thanh Nguyen – #ownvoices, Literary Fiction, Historical Fiction, Vietnamese MCs
  3. Asian Immigrant MC – Something in Between by Melissa De La Cruz – #ownvoices, YA, Contemporary, Undocumented Filipina American MC
  4. Asian MC with a Disability – Four Weeks, Five People by Jennifer Yu – #ownvoices, YA, Contemporary, Asian American MC w/ OCD/anxiety
  5. Multiracial/Multiethnic Asian MC – Always and Forever, Lara Jean by Jenny Han – #ownvoices, YA, Contemporary, Biracial white/Korean American MC
  6. LGBTQIAP+ Asian MC – Seven Tears at High Tide by C.B. Lee – #ownvoices, YA, Fantasy, M/M Romance, Bisexual Vietnamese American MC
  7. West Asian MC – Ten Things I Hate About Me by Randa Abdel-Fattah – YA, Contemporary, Lebanese-Australian MC
  8. Asian Muslim AC – That Thing We Call a Heart by Sheba Karim – #ownvoices, YA, Contemporary, Pakistani American MC
  9. Religious Asian MC – A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki – #ownvoices, iterary Fiction, Magical Realism, Zen Buddhist Japanese American MC
  10. Poor or Working Class Asian MC – One Half from the East by Nadia Hashimi – #ownvoices, MG, Contemporary, Afghan MC
  11. SFF with Asian MC – The Library of Fates by Aditi Khorana – #ownvoices, YA, Fantasy, Indian MC
  12. Historical Fiction with Asian MC – It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas – #ownvoices, MG, Iranian American MC in the 70s
  13. Free Space – The House of Shattered Wings by Aliette de Bodard – #ownvoices, Fantasy, French Vietnamese MC
  14. Retelling with Asian MC – The Palace of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni – #ownvoices, Fantasy, Retelling of the Mahabharata, Indian MC
  15. Contemporary with Asian MC – She’s So Money by Cherry Cheva – #ownvoices, YA, Thai American MC
  16. Graphic Novel with Asian MC – Monstress Vol. 1 by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda
  17. Queer Romance with Asian MC – Flowers of Luna by Jennifer Linsky – #ownvoices, Science Fiction, F/F Romance, Biracial Japanese MC
  18. Romance w/ POC/Indigenous Love Interest – It’s Not LIke It’s a Secret by Misa Sugiura – #ownvoices, YA, Contemporary, F/F Romance, Japanese American MC, Latina LI
  19. Central Asian MC – Jamilia by Chingiz Aitmatov – #ownvoices, Literary Fiction, Historical Fiction, Kyrgyz MC
  20. Translated Work by an Asian Author – Dragon Sword and Wind Child by Noriko Ogiwara – #ownvoices, YA, Fantasy, Japanese MC
  21. Southeast Asian MC – Roots and Wings by Many Ly – #ownvoices, YA, Contemporary, Cambodian American MC
  22. Asian Superhero MC – The Shadow Hero by Gene Yang and Sonny Liew – #ownvoices, Chinese American MC
  23. Asian Transracial Adoptee MC – The Leavers by Lisa Ko – #ownvoices, Literary Fiction, Chinese American MC
  24. Non-Fiction by an Asian Author – The Making of Asian America by Erika Lee
  25. South Asian MC – Swimming in the Monsoon Sea by Shyam Selvadurai – #ownvoices, YA, Historical Fiction, M/M Romance, Sri Lankan MC

A Very ARC-ish Readathon TBR

So Aimal over at Bookshelves & Paperbacks is hosting a readathon during the month of April dedicated to burning through those ARCs that have piled up over time because you went overboard and requested too many at once. I have a whopping 13 ARCs, so I decided to join in. I probably won’t get through all of them in 27 days I have, but I’ll try. Here are the ARCs I need to read:

Middle Grade

Crossing Ebenezer Creek by Tonya Bolden

The Gauntlet by Karuna Riazi – I actually have the finished copy of this one now, oops.

Young Adult

The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco

Dreadnought by April Daniels

Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World edited by Kelly Jensen

Mask of Shadows by Linsey Miller

The Education of Margot Sanchez by Lilliam Rivera – Also have the finished copy already lmao.

Girl Out of Water by Laura Silverman

The Edge of the Abyss by Emily Skrutskie – I reviewed the first book, The Abyss Surrounds Us, earlier this year.

Welcome Home: An Anthology on Love and Adoption edited by Eric Smith

Adult/Literary Fiction

The Djinn Falls in Love and Other Stories featuring the following authors:

Neil Gaiman, Amal El-Mohtar, Catherine King, Claire North, E. J. Swift, Hermes, Jamal Majoub, James Smythe, J. Y. Yang, Kamila Shamsie, Kirsty Logan, K.J. Parker, Kuzhali Manickavel, Maria Dahvana Headley, Monica Byrne, Nnedi Okorafor, Saad Hossein, Sami Shah, Sophia Al-Maria, Usman Malik

The Leavers by Lisa Ko

Inheritance from Mother by Minae Mizumura

February TBR and Book List: #ReadYourResistance and Black History Month

I decided a while back to do some mini themed reading challenges in 2017 that I create for myself in order to make it easier to pick what to read next out of a few hundred titles on my TBR. These challenges follow various history, heritage, and awareness months in the U.S. Though this decision predates and wasn’t inspired by #ReadYourResistance, it ties in neatly with that hashtag, which symbolizes a commitment to reading books by marginalized voices to challenge the dominant narratives that dehumanize them and to fight the increase in persecution of marginalized people under Trump’s regime.

February is Black History Month, so most of my TBR will be books by Black authors. Aside from the books I want to read for the month of February, I’m also listing January and February releases by Black authors, some already released books by Black authors on my 2017 TBR that I won’t get to in February, and books featuring Black characters (mostly #ownvoices) that are coming out later this year. And lastly, I’ll list a few February releases by non-black authors that I’m looking forward to.

(Note: Release dates are U.S. release dates.)

Books by Black Authors I Plan to Read in February

boy-snow-bird

Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

This book is a sort-of Snow White retelling that tackles the complex issue of mixed race identity and “passing” for white, with critical attention to racialized beauty standards. I’d already seen it here and there, and when Barnes & Noble was selling a copy at a reduced price a few months ago, I snatched it up. I’ve heard that there is some problematic content, so I’ll be on the lookout for that so I can discuss it in my review.

americanah

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie

I was first introduced to her through two different TED talks, one on feminism, the other on the “danger of a single story” and stereotyping. I read We Should All Be Feminists about a year or two ago and have been meaning to read the rest of her work. Americanah shall be that first step toward that goal. It’s a story of race, romance, and immigration that spans three continents, Africa (Lagos, Nigeria), North America, and Europe (London, England).

All of Nnedi Okorafor’s books, aside from Akata Witch, which I read in December last year.

She writes both YA and adult SFF and has won multiple awards (the Hugo, the Nebula, and the World Fantasy Awards, among others) for her books. She’s Nigerian (Igbo) American and draws on her Nigerian heritage and West African cultures for her work.

  •  Zahrah the Windseeker – YA, fantasy, in the kingdom of Ooni, those born with the dadalocks are feared for their powers. Zahrah is one such person, and when her friend Dari is endangered, she is forced to confront the things that make her different
  • The Shadow Speaker – YA, science fiction, in 2070 Niger, a young woman seeks revenge for her father’s murder and finds herself on a trans-Saharan quest to save her people from a force that threatens to annihilate them all
  • Binti – Science fiction, when Binti becomes the first of her people to be accepted at the prestigious Oomza, the best university in the galaxy, she must leave her family and travel among people who neither understand nor respect her culture
  • Binti: Home (Sequel to Binti)
  • Kabu-Kabu – Anthology, SFF, a collection of short stories that take you to far-flung places of magic, adventure, and danger
  • Who Fears Death – Science fiction, as a biracial child of rape, Onyesonwu (“Who Fears Death?”) faces prejudice wherever she goes. However, she has great powers and an even greater destiny
  • The Book of Phoenix (Who Fears Death #2)
  • Lagoon – Science fiction – after a large object crashes into the sea on the coast of Lagos, Nigeria, three people from different walks of life must work together to save the country they love

All of N.K. Jemisin’s books.

Also a multi-award-winning author (the Hugo and the Locus). She has three different adult SFF series so far.

The Inheritance Trilogy:

  1. The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms – Yeine Darr hails from the north, and when her mother dies, she is summoned to the city of Sky, ruled by the Arameri family and named an heir to the king. However, her ascendance isn’t a given, and she must compete for the throne with many cousins.
  2. The Broken Kingdoms
  3. The Kingdom of Gods

The Dreamblood Duology:

  1. The Killing Moon – In the city of Gujaareh, the Gatherers maintain order by harnessing the power of sleeping minds to heal and kill those deemed corrupt. Peace reigns until Ehiru, the most famous of these Gatherers, realizes that someone is killing innocents in the name of the Goddess.
  2. The Shadowed Sun

The Broken Earth Trilogy:

  1. The Fifth Season – Chaos has struck in just one day. An empire falls, a continent rends in two, spewing ash to blacken the sky, and in a small town, a woman named Essun loses her son to murder and her daughter to kidnapping at the hands of her own husband. Resources are scarce, everyone is fighting for their survival, and Essun will do anything to save her daughter, even if it means breaking the world itself.
  2. The Obelisk Gate
  3. Book 3 is not out yet, but it’s called The Stone Sky and is releasing later this year on August 17th!

Two books by Octavia Butler.

Octavia Butler is one of the most well-known Black women in science fiction. Her books are considered classics by some and overlooked by many because of racism/misogynoir, of course. Here are my two picks:

  • Kindred – Described as a “combination of slave memoir, fantasy, and historical fiction,” this book is about an African American woman who travels backward in time in order to save her own ancestor.
  • Parable of the Sower Given the current state of affairs in U.S. politics, it feels appropriate for me to read a dystopian novel by a Black woman.

Parable of the Sower is the #DSFFBookClub (Diverse Science Fiction and Fantasy Book Club, hosted by Naz at Read Diverse Books) pick for February, so if you want to read and participate in a discussion at the end of the month, definitely join us. 😀

January Releases and February Releases by Black Authors

  • Midnight Without a Moon by Linda Williams Jackson – MG, historical fiction, a fictionalized account of the Emmett Till case through the perspective of a young black girl in Jim Crow era Mississippi
  • Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson – YA, contemporary, tackles systemic racism in the American justice system through the story of a Black teen girl in the foster care system who allegedly murdered a baby (note: I’ve seen reviews/comments from diverse book bloggers about problematic content re: homophobia, rape apologism, anti-Indian racism, etc., so be careful if you are planning to read this)
  • The Harlem Charade by Natasha Tarpley – MG, contemporary, three kids, Elvin, Jin, and Alex, work together to solve the mystery of what happened to Elvin’s grandfather, only to stumble on priceless artworks that might just save their neighborhood from gentrification by a wealthy politician
  • Piecing Me Together by RenĂ©e Watson (out Feb. 14th) – YA, contemporary, addresses the intersections of racism, classism, sexism, sizeism/fatphobia and more through the story of a Black girl who attends an elite, mostly white school
  • American Street by Ibi Zoboi (out Feb. 14th) – YA, contemporary, focuses on a Haitian American immigrant girl trying to fit in and her mother’s undocumented immigration experience
  • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (out Feb. 28th) – YA, contemporary, a novel inspired by Black Lives Matter that addresses police brutality and systemic antiblack racism through the story of a girl who witnesses an unarmed friend’s fatal shooting at the hands of police

Later 2017 Releases by Black Authors

  • One Shadow on the Wall by Leah Henderson (out June 6th; Black author) – MG, magical realism, the story of a Senegalese boy dealing with the difficulty of keeping his family together and honoring a promise to his deceased father after he and his sisters are orphaned
  • Solo by Kwame Alexander (out July 25th; Black Author) – YA, contemporary, a novel-in-verse about a Black teen whose father is a famous musician with an addiction problem as he explores family secrets and forbidden love
  • Little & Lion by Brandy Colbert (out Aug. 8th; Black author) – YA, contemporary, a Black Jewish girl moves back home to L.A., helps her brother with his bipolar disorder, and falls in love with the same girl he loves
  • Beasts Made of Night by Tochi Onyebuchi (out Sep. 26th; Nigerian American author) – YA, fantasy, a debut novel featuring a talented young sin-eater who is called upon to eat the sin-beast of a royal, only to find himself caught in a web of political intrigue that puts the life of the princess he loves at stake
  • Dear Martin by Nic Stone (out Oct. 17th; Black author) – YA, contemporary, a incisive story about police brutality from the perspective of a Black teen whose status at the top of his elite prep school doesn’t prevent him from being racially profiled
  • My Life as an Ice Cream Sandwich by Ibi Zoboi (release date TBA; Haitian American author) – MG, historical fiction, a young Black scifi geek girl tries to find a place to belong in the 80s hip-hop explosion in Harlem
  • Akata Warrior (Sequel to Akata Witch) by Nnedi Okorafor (release date TBA; Nigerian American author) – MG/YA, fantasy, no blurb yet, but I’m sure Sunny and her friends return for another juju-filled adventure

Already Released Books by Black Authors I’d Like to Read in 2017

  • Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson – MG, memoir, novel-in-verse, tells the story of the author’s experience growing up as a Black girl in the Civil Rights era of the 60s and 70s and the joy she found in words and writing
  • Pointe by Brandy Colbert – YA, contemporary, a story of a Black ballerina that addresses heavy topics like eating disorders and child sexual abuse
  • The Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds – YA, contemporary, a young Black teen deals with the loss of his mother and his absent father’s alcoholism while working at a funeral home and meets a girl who gives him hope
  • This Side of Home by RenĂ©e Watson – YA, contemporary, identical twins Nikki and Maya start to diverge when they go off to attend college at a historically black college and develop different opinions on the importance of home and their ethnicity and culture
  • Endangered by Lamar Giles – YA, contemporary, a Black teen runs an anonymous blog on her high school’s scandals and ends up drawn into a deadly game by someone who threatens to expose her identity
  • Touching Snow by M. Sindy Felin – YA, contemporary, a Haitian American girl struggles to live a normal life and change her situation for the better after her abusive father is taken away
  • All-American Boys by Jason Reynolds – YA, contemporary, a Black teen, Rashad, is beaten by the police for supposedly stealing when he didn’t, a white teen, Quinn, witnesses it, and when the incident becomes national news and the center of a debate on police brutality and systemic racism, all of a sudden Quinn’s silence is no longer just a personal choice
  • The Crossover by Kwame Alexander – MG, contemporary, this novel-in-verse tells the tale of twins Josh and Jordan as they play basketball and learn lessons about life both on and off the court
  • Perfect Liars by Kimberly Reid – YA, contemporary, interracial romance (Black girl, Korean boy), when Drea’s parents disappear, her perfect girl facade as junior class valedictorian begins to crumble and she finds herself in the company of delinquents from her school who share more in common with her than one might expect

Nonfiction Books About Black Women

  • Redefining Realness by Janet Mock: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More – in this memoir, Janet Mock, a Black trans woman activist, talks about her transition and the struggles to live her life as her authentic self
  • Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina by Misty Copeland – in her memoir, ballet prodigy Misty Copeland recounts her path from living in a motel room to becoming a successful professional dancer and the first Black principal dancer for the American Ballet Theatre
  • Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly – in this historical biography, Margot Lee Shetterly tells the stories of four extraordinary Black women (Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden), who worked at NASA during the height of the Space Race and an era of segregation and Jim Crow laws and made monumental contributions to their field
  • Courage to Soar: A Body in Motion, A Life in Balance by Simone Biles – Gymnastics champion and Olympian Simone Biles shares the story of her journey to becoming a gymnast with the help of faith and family
  • Black Girl Dangerous on Race, Queerness, Class and Gender by Mia Mckenzie – in this honest, humorous, and accessible essay anthology, popular blogger and activist Mia McKenzie shares stories about intersectionality, identity, activism, and allyship from the perspective of a queer Black woman